Tai Chi Fighting Set

Tai Chi Fighting Set

Autor : Jwing-Ming Yang
Género : Libros, Deporte, Deportes de combate y defensa personal,
Leer : 1560
Descargar : 1300
Tamaño de archivo : 8.64 MB
Formato : PDF, ePub

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Tai Chi Fighting Set

Críticas JOURNAL OF ASIAN MARTIAL ARTS V14 N4 Reviewed by Michael DeMarco, Seton hall University I am aware of only a few teachers in the United States and elsewhere who teach this advanced matching set and was surprised to see YMAA producing it in video format. In Chinese, this two-person routine is called San Shou. It should not be confused with the modern, full-contact, fighting sport that goes by the same name. San is usually translated as to disperse, to scatter, or to dissipate. In combination with shou (hands), the practice refers to methods of dissipating any attack. Dr. Yang gives an introductory talk about San Shou, basically discussing it as a way to practice all the Taiji principles for self-defense. He stresses the practical applications and effectiveness resulting from becoming greatly familiar with this set. If an individual has the potential, it takes over ten years of practice with a minimum of 3-4 hours per day to master Taijiquan. In the traditional teaching method, the Long Form is studied for three years, then Push Hands. The two-person fighting set is the last part of the system to be studied. On this video, no solid historical background is given regarding the arts origin and lineage. Rather, Dr. Yang explains the set as his two assistants perform it. Since there are 44 movements for each side, a total of 88 matching techniques form the routine. From initial contact, both practitioners are in physical contact until the end of the routine. One attacking movement is neutralized and another attack and defense follow repeatedly throughout the routine. The variety of San Shou techniques include punching, kicking, trapping, sweeping, and subtle neutralizations. Since there are many possible applications for each technique, the routine contains much more than meets the eye. Dr. Yang believes that every movement should be explained and initially practiced at slow speed. After one becomes familiar with the routine, the tempo can be increased to medium speed. At the highest level, the routine is practiced at actual fighting speed. Key points are provided for following the video: understand at least one application for each technique; master the skills of angling, trapping, yielding, and the technique itself; master stepping and distancing between partners; master trapping and how to evade trapping; train for effective power as used offensively and defensively; and develop one s sense of the enemy. If all of these can be absorbed, then the practitioner can become more creative, enlarging the routine into a live art. Following the introductory lecture, Dr. Yang s assistants perform single techniques in slow motion with pauses. Dr. Yang adds insights to each technique, explaining them with the help of traditional Chinese medical theory as found in acupuncture. Half of the set is covered in this way and then shown as a continuous sequence. Dr. Yang warns those who wish to learn from the video to try not to learn too quick. Otherwise bad habits accumulate. Learn slowly and become as accurate as possible. The remaining half of the routine is taught in similar fashion to the first half. After each technique is demonstrated singly and then strung together in a continuous flow, the video shows the partner practice at the three speeds. The partners demonstrate in a primary direction, but also show movements from the opposite angles for better visual comprehension. The video concludes with Dr. Yang thanking his assistants for their help and dedication. Any practice that involves the high levels of skills represented in San Shou is a challenge to demonstrate in front of a camera. He states that the quality is not as high as I wish, but I am satisfied. He should be. Although the filming is straight forward in simplicity and the narrative lacks a --Google reviewerPatrick Dickson, 2006 'I've been waiting for a video of the two man fighting set for a long time and I'm thrilled that Dr. Yang, Jwing Ming was the one to release it. There is very little information in English that covers the two man fighting set of Taijiquan. T. T. Liang has a book that covers a different two man fighting set, which he calls the Taiji dance. As mentioned in the video, the two man fighting set was traditionally taught to only a few select students. If you are serious about understanding and practicing real Taijiquan, then the two man fighting set can help teach the fighting techniques of Taijiquan to the interested practitioner. Fortunately, there are still many health benefits available to the practitioner even without knowing the applications. But I am firmly convinced that if a practitioner learns the martial applications and practices them, then the health benefits increase as a result of the postures being done more accurately My point? Learn the applications to increase and enhance your practice. Once you have learned and become comfortable with some of the martial applications, then learning this two man fighting set will become easier. As the video states, if you are already proficient at pushing hands and the form, then this set is not as daunting as it appears, and it can be learned easily (with some hard work and dedication). --Google reviewer Reseña del editor Every day, Tai Chi Chuan is practiced by millions of men and women worldwide as a moving meditation, known for its health benefits. However, its origins are in the martial arts. A fighting set is a sequence of movements which teaches the student how to apply the martial art in a real-life fighting situation. This DVD comprehensively instructs and demonstrates the 88 Posture, 2-Person Fighting Matching Set for advanced Taijiquan (Tai Chi Chuan). This Fighting Set is a combination of techniques from pushing hands and the solo Taijiquan sequence, and it serves as a bridge connecting pushing hands with real fighting. Like pushing hands, it teaches you how to sense your opponent s actions and intentions, and it also teaches footwork and how to set up your strategy, making your fighting skill more realistic and alive. Anyone who is proficient at a solo Tai Chi sequence and pushing hands should be able to learn this fighting set easily, and make it part of their practice routine. In ancient times, this form was taught by a few masters to only a handful of trusted students as a part of the final training of Taijiquan as a sophisticated and extremely effective fighting art.

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